Tenapa

Ile Ape is located on the north coast of Lembata. Textiles from this area are more geometrical compared to those made on the southern coast. The motifs from Ile Ape appear within small bands throughout the textile with the exception of the Tenapa which has a full ikat centrefield. There are three types of traditional textiles used for bride wealth gift exchanges: Hebakan, Ohin and Tenapa. All of these textiles require handspun thread and natural dyes. The Tenapa is the most highly valued and only a few women have the skills to make this type of cloth.

Kreot Nai Juan

Kreot Nai Juan is a two-part bride wealth tubular sarong with uncut warps from Topobali on the southern coast of Lembata. It is essential to the gifts that accompany marriage. The three-part (Kreot Nai Telon) textile is considered more valuable in this gift exchange. The more parts: the higher the value of the sarong. Textiles offered to the groom’s family by the bride’s clan are exchanged for elephant tusks which are held by clans dating back to about the 16th century. With all of these tubular sarongs, the warp threads remain uncut symbolizing the bond and commitment to the community. These textiles are never worn.

Kwatek Nai Rua

Kwatek Nai Rua is a two-part bride wealth tubular sarong with uncut warps from Lamalara on the southern coast of Lembata. It is essential to the gifts that accompany marriage. The three-part (Kwatek Nai Telo) and five-part (Kwatek Nai Limo) textiles are considered more valuable in this gift exchange. The more sections to the cloth, the higher the value of the sarong. Textiles offered to the groom’s family by the bride’s clan are exchanged for elephant tusks which are held by clans dating back to about the 16th century. With all of these tubular sarongs, the warp threads remain uncut symbolizing the bond and commitment to the community. These textiles are never worn.

Kwatek Nai Telo

The three-part tubular textile from the southern coast of Lembata is called Kwatek Nai Telo and is essential to the gifts that accompany marriage. Kwatek Nai Rua or two-part textile is considered less valuable than the Kwatek Nai Telo in this gift exchange. Textiles offered to the groom’s family by the bride’s clan are exchanged for elephant tusks which are held by clans dating back to about the 16th century. With all of these tubular sarongs, the warp threads remain uncut symbolizing the bond and commitment to the community. These textiles are never worn.

Kwatek Menikil

Kwatek Menikil is a two-part textile from the southern coast of Lembata. This type of textile is usually dyed to dark blue or blue black is woven with handspun threads and is worn for daily dress.

Ohin

Ile Ape is located on the north coast of Lembata. There are three types of traditional textiles in this area; Hebakan, Ohin and Tenapa. The Ohin is predominately red with simple bands of ikat throughout the entire cloth. These textiles are all used as bridewealth textiles with the Ohin being the second most valued cloth with the Tenapa being the most highly valued and only a few women have the skills to make this latter cloth. These textiles require handspun thread and natural dyes.

Hebakan

Ile Ape is located on the north coast of Lembata. There are three types of traditional textiles in this area; Hebakan, Ohin and Tenapa. The Hebakan being predominately black with simple bands of ikat at the two ends. These textiles are all used as bridewealth textiles with the Hebakan being the less valuable. These textiles require handspun thread and natural dyes. 

Senai

This one panel textile is locally known as a Senai which is a narrow textile woven to be worn over the shoulder or around the neck by a woman to compete her traditional dress.

Nofi

The man’s traditional textile worn by the men in Lamalera is called a Nofi. It is a simple striped textile on a white background. It was traditionally woven out of handspun thread and using natural dyes.

Senai Birin Pilipetot

Senai Birin Pilipetot is a single panel head cloth from the southern coast of Lembata. It is woven using a floating warp patterning (pilipetot) technique worn by male spiritual leaders during ceremonies.

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